Tuesday, 27 October 2009

The Good News Is... A Giveaway


I am thrilled to have the opportunity to run a brand spanking new giveaway. Buyster Lighting is giving one lucky reader the opportunity to win a voucher for $130 to spend on a new light or lamp of your choice.

Lighting has the power to really make or break a room. I'm always trawling blogs and decorating magazines looking for inspiration, the addition of a lamp can really boost the mood (and who doesn't love a bit of mood lighting? or some tricky up-lighting to take ten years off?).

And who wouldn't love to rub a lamp and have a genie appear? Come on, I know you want to, but what would your three wishes be? Hmmm.. Chocolate to be calorie free? Weekends and weekdays to switch (2 days of work, 5 days of weekend)? Rabbits not to bite? (Just to save you time, Buyster Lighting don't have any genie lamps in stock at the moment, maybe after Christmas.)

And here you are my friend wondering how to enter?
So easy all you have to do is answer this question:

What's been one of your big lightbulb moments? (mine is always changing, but lately, it's that personal success is not just one single thing, it's ever-evolving).
Competition will close next Wednesday 4th November and is only open to Australian readers. Sorry to my international readers. I still love you.

19 comments:

Vic @ Punky and Me said...

As corny and/or cliche as it sounds, the birth of my daughter was my lightbulb moment, I realised then that "Life is short" because I wanted to be around forever to protect my precious angel & realised with a start that I couldn't be.
That moment has made me appreciate my life so much more & because of it I am able to find joy in places I never could before & am a happier, nicer (& just for the benefit of your giveaway PM) brighter person.

dearmolly said...

Just because someone is an 'adult' doesn't mean they've attained some automatic sense of justice, responsibility and common sense. I used to always afford respect to my elders because they were adults but in my late 20s (a long time ago!!) it all became incredibly clear...

I definitely need the lights on at my place and lamp lighting is just the change I need from hideous downlights.

Thanks for the giveaway!

Miss Muggins said...

My biggest lightbulb moment came many years ago, when I was a young Mum, with a baby and a 3 year old and was experiencing unexplained nocturnal seizures that resulted in my driver's license being cancelled. I came to realise not to ask why is it happening to me, but what can I learn from it? I certainly learned to slow down and appreciate what I had. Now that seems like a distant bad dream, but I still remind myself of that lightbulb moment from time to time when things start getting on top of me.

Carrie G said...

bummer from the USA...

pepper said...

Well,know it is obvious and a bit silly, but it occured to me that the meaning of life may not be finding someone to share it with. That, actually, I have so many things I love to do, I could probably achieve so much with that extra energy, and statistically I'm very likely to stumble into love anyhow when I least expect it! Bit silly, isn't it! Somehow the thought struck me though, and now I try to be aware if I'm getting a bit too sappy.

Blackbird Corner said...

My latest one just happened. That approach from Buyster in my SPAM folder wasn't SPAM. And they have such lovely lamps (I have just discovered!!!) Ah well will be less paranoid next time.....Winning this giveaway would be great compensation for my stupidity in deleting before investigating further!!! LOL

Polka Dot Rabbit said...

Mine was falling in love with my husband. Made me realise what a healthy, functional relationship could be like...

Fern said...

My one was my son having his first seizure, the fear of losing a child woke up a new person inside me. It made me realise just how one more round of an irritating song wasn't a big deal, how the ketchup on the walls wouldn't be there forever, and how when I look back on my life the article I'm trying to finish will not even be significant, but the time I spent with my kids would be.

I wouldn't say I was a bad mother before, but I have tried harder than ever to re-evaluate all of my priorities since my son showed me just how fragile life is.

h&b said...

hmm - they contacted me too, but I haven't done anything about it yet. I don't think i will now, and will let them know why..

karen said...

You can't change anyone's behaviour but your own. Something I need to remind myself of, every now and then when the offspring get a bit much!

Toni Brockliss said...

I have lightbulb moments just about every day...being a bit slow on the uptake. :)
These range from getting the punchline to a joke hours after someone told it or coming up with a good retort. The plus side is that people think I am always laughing. They don't know it's because I only just got something said a day ago.
But my serious lightbulb moment came just a few days ago. My little boy is Autistic and he is going to an early intervention centre in his doctor's words...help him be "normal"....
My son is a light in my life, my own lightbulb. Who cares if he looks at life in a different way. What exactly is normal anyway?
In the end I just want him to be happy.

Thanks PMM. You are a treasure.

Megan said...

polka dot rabbit took the words right out of my mouth (and her's were much more succint than mine). its amazing how much you don't realise you are in an unhealthy relationship until you are lucky enough to meet an amazing and wonderful person who spoils you and makes you feel more special than you have ever felt before

thanks for the very useful giveaway!

Two Tuesdays said...

Hmmmm... not as profound as others - but I realised today that the reason all my clothes were getting wet in the cupboard was because the washing machine was leaking and not that my little one was mistaking the drawers for the potty. Like I said, not profound but, believe me, it was a HUGE moment.

Jessi said...

my biggest light bulb moment was when I realised that I am going die one day. That I am not immortal and will not be. That life is special, even if it does kick you hard up the buttocks sometimes.

It has allowed me to embrace each day and strive to reach "achievable" goals. (not un-achievable goals, like wishing my body back to looking pre-pubescent)

As my new necklace pendant reads

"what lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies beneath us"

I have learnt or am TRYING to learn to embrace myself for who I am today!

no blog norma said...

realising that unless i learnt to use my sewing machine, all that inspiration on blogs with gorgeous softies to look at ( and i wanted them ) all the crafting goodness with sometimes great patterns to use and buy. if i didnt give it a go , then i would miss out.so learning to make really was a pretty good moment for me.

Sarah Lou said...

that my familys history of mistakes suicides and mentall illness does not have to e my future

Christina Lowry said...

If the answer is "Because I said so" always ask "Why?"....

:)

kris said...

A lightbulb moment... I had one a couple of years ago that is a total highlight! (Pardon the pun!) I was working as a special education teacher's assistant in an autism unit. It was a full on job as you could imagine! And one of my kids, a little 5 year old Sri Lankan boy with autism who liked to run, had escaped the school and was fleeing up the street towards Northborne Ave (Think Main St Canberra...) I took off after him, dodged cars and bikes and even a moving truck chasing this kid.

My lungs were bursting. And the thought just popped into my head clear as a bell... I didn't have to do this anymore! I didn't have to work in this job! Sure I loved the kids but the conditions were terrible. We had locks on the doors. There just wasn't enough staff to go around. To get the funding the principal took in too many kids and lumped them in the room with 3 staff and the funding went on other areas of the school. We were exhausted. But you get attached to the kids and feel protective and obligated to be there for them... but on this day I had just had enough. And when I realised I could go it was such a weight off my shoulders.

I think of those kids all the time. But I know leaving was the right thing. I returned to uni and now I have a career as a librarian that I would never have had if I stayed.

I guess it made me realise I what it meant to take responsibility for myself.

Bronwyn said...

One that comes to my mind is pretty obscure - I realised driving along one day, that if I died tomorrow, my husband would not know how to feed my kids (other than nachos!). That set me on a course of not hogging the kitchen when it comes to meal times; actually explaining what recipes mean by 'creaming the butter and sugar'; encouraging small efforts to cook. Maybe the kids will just eat nachos 24/7, but at least I died trying LOL!